Homelessness

When we opened our shelter in 1976, we thought that we’d be able to close in a few short years, having helped the homeless women in Worcester find housing. Unfortunately, the need for a safe place to stay continues to be even greater today.

  • The number of individuals experiencing homelessness has more than doubled since 1990 according to the Massachusetts Coalition for the Homeless.
  • An estimated 17,565 people were homeless on any given night in Massachusetts in 2017 according to the 2017 Annual Homeless Assessment Report (AHAR) to Congress published by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
  • On any given night in Massachusetts, more than 13,000 individuals in families experience homelessness. Approximately 60 percent of them are children, according to the Boston Foundation’s 2017 report, The Growing Challenge of Family Homelessness Homeless Assistance for Families in Massachusetts: Trends in Use FY2008-FY2016

Housing*

Affordable housing is out of reach for those with the lowest incomes.

  • To afford a 1-bedroom rental home at Fair Market Rent making minimum wage ($11/hour), you would have to work 84 hours each week in Massachusetts.
  • In Massachusetts, Fair Market Rent is $1,204/month for a 1-bedroom unit and $1,489/month for a 2-bedroom unit.

But, the affordable rent for low income households are

  • $572/month for minimum wage workers
  • $644/month for Worcester households at 30% of the area median income
  • $697/month for workers earning the average renter wage in Worcester

*Housing statistics are from the National Low Income Housing Coalition’s 2018 Out of Reach Report.

At Abby’s. . .

We are dedicated to providing women and their children with shelter, affordable housing, and the support they need to get back on their feet.

The women who arrive on our doorstep come to us from many different circumstances. Some may have just escaped an abusive relationship. Others may have lost their job. Every situation is unique, and every woman has unique needs. Read their stories.

At Abby’s, we rely on the support of the community since we do not receive government funding for our programs. This allows us to serve women from many different circumstances, helping each woman meet her individual goals.

Success is different for every woman. For us, success is each step a woman takes towards reaching her goals!

Our Impact

Since we began in 1976, we’ve helped more than 13,000 women and their children reclaim and rebuild their lives.

See how, with your support, we’ve been changing lives for over 40 years.

Our Impact in 2017

Programs

Becoming the Best Advocates We Can Be

With your support, we were able to expand our advocacy team in 2017, which has enabled us to better serve the women and children of Abby’s House.

Advocacy Highlights

  • Established a Director of Supportive Services position
  • Expanded a part-time shelter position into a full-time position

Leading to. . .

  • Enhanced ability to recognize and link women to resources to stabilize their mental health and maintain recovery.
  • More one-on-one support available to women during nontraditional business hours
  • Women in shelter successfully find housing in a shorter amount of time

The Annette Rafferty Survive to Thrive Fund (ARST)

In 2017, $11,756 was given through ARST to help women meet their goals, deal with an emergency, or enhance their quality of life.

Some of the Ways in Which ARST Helps

Tuition for a Nursing DegreeCosts Related to Transitioning to an ApartmentCosts to Obtain a Birth Certificate & MA Identification CardsCopays - Pay off Medical Bills

Women’s Center

Women find continued support, camaraderie, and services in our Women’s Center, located at 52 High Street.

In 2017, we focused on providing health and wellness activities, programs, and workshops, providing women with the tools and resources needed to better their physical and mental well-being.

Women's Center 2017

Thrift Shop

  • Over 200 vouchers given for free clothing to current and former guests and residents, as well as homeless or low-income women referred to us by our community partners.
  • $219,560 in revenue raised through the Thrift Shop for our shelter, housing, and advocacy programs